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Foto Friday: Window

April 11, 2014

Old window in Lancaster, PA

Visual evidence of why old windows are important.  Seen in Lancaster, PA.  (Photo: Sabra Smith)

News Flash: Suit Corner Two-Alarm Fire

April 9, 2014

Suit Corner fire at Market & N. 3rd Streets. (Photo by Cheryl Sams O’Neill)

This morning there are reports of a two-alarm fire at the Suit Corner building on the corner of Market and N. 3rd Streets.  Photos show flames on the roof of the five-story building next to the Suit Corner store.

A recent Time Machine post noted the collapse of the graphically attention-grabbing Shirt Corner buildings kitty corner to the location of the fire.  I said that we’d at least still have the Suit Corner graphics — but that appears doubtful now.

Philly CBS news offers an updated report that says the fire started in the front window of the Suit Corner building.

Dramatic photo gallery at the NBC website.

 

 

Foto Friday: A Philadelphia View

March 28, 2014

There’s a lot of brick construction in Philadelphia, what with all the city’s connections to colonial times.  What is not appreciated often enough is the rich portfolio of architecture from other periods, from Victorian to mid-century modern, found within the city limits.

Sometimes you look left while crossing the street and come across the most remarkable layers…

architecture in Philadelphia

The Kimmel Center is just one layer in this view of Philadelphia’s architectural layers (Photo by Sabra Smith)

So Long Shirt Corner…

March 26, 2014

While I was still working in Old City, work began on rehabbing the old brick buildings — better known as Shirt Corner, for the bold red, white, and blue graphic painted on their exteriors.

Shirt Corner buildings being rehabbed

Shirt Corner buildings being rehabbed, at the corner of Market and N3RD Streets. (Photo by Sabra Smith)

 

Not long after, this happened.

 

shirt corner

 

The article reports that the buildings were found to be unstable while the rehab work was underway, necessitating demolition.  Though I have heard cynical old building fans express the opinion that clearing the site was the plan all along, providing the owner with a large, cleared lot and the option for new construction without working around old buildings.

Either way, we would have lost the bold bicentennial-era graphics.

But at least we still have Suit Corner across the street.

 

 

Foto Friday: Then & Now

March 23, 2014

THEN

"Hats Trimmed Free of Charge," Lit Bros. Building, Market Street, Philadelphia (Photo by Sabra Smith)

“Hats Trimmed Free of Charge,” Lit Bros. Building, Market Street, Philadelphia (Photo by Sabra Smith)

AND NOW

sign on building

“Hats Embroidered While You Wait,” near Penn Station, New York City (Photo by Sabra Smith)

Eloise never lived here…

February 26, 2014

Hotel Plaza (Card Cow image). Poscard text reads: “5th and Cooper Sts. Modern popular priced coffee shop restaurant, Brigantine bar, cocktail lounge, offices, barber shop. 222 rooms in a fireproof building”

The Plaza Hotel (built 1927) in Camden, New Jersey, is no more.

Heavy equipment started work on razing the building on Tuesday, February 25.  The demolition crew anticipates leveling the site in a few weeks.

A local member of the Camden County Historical Society calls the building’s demise another case of demolition by neglect, blaming absentee owners for the loss.

According to an article in the Philadelphia Inquirer, “The seven-floor brick hotel in its heyday featured a German dining room and live music in the ballroom. Its proximity to the RCA recording studio made it a common place for visiting musicians to stay.”

Hotel Plaza upper floors

Photo by Sabra Smith

doorway detail of The Plaza Hotel, Camden NJ

Photo by Sabra Smith

historic preservation, building to be demolish, demolition by neglect

Photo by Sabra Smith

Hotel Plaza architectural detail, demolition by neglect

Photo by Sabra Smith

 

 

Happy Valentine’s Day!

February 14, 2014

Valentine cupid 1908Hearts?  Flowers?

Which valentine to share?

I decided on hearts AND flowers.

First, I selected one of the earliest in my grandfather’s collection.  These two cherubs apparently want you to know that time is of the essence in letting your valentine know how you feel!  “Valentine Greeting”

Shamrocks float through the air to bring you luck and forget-me-nots surround the clockface, where the hands mark the time as twelve. (On the other side, the postmark on the one penny Benjamin Franklin stamp indicates it was mailed at twelve noon on February 13, 1908 from Fairhill Station in Philadelphia.)

The card, printed in Germany, was addressed to Master Paul White, Tylersport Post Office, Pa. and sent by “Wm. Mergner”

I also couldn’t resist sharing this rose and horseshoe postcard.  The graphic quality appealed to me, and was  such a contrast to the busy floral sweetness of the Valentine Greetings cupid card.

Anthony Kobus & Sons Camden NJ 1908The text says;

Business Improvement Asso’n Carnival of Camden, 1908

Compliments of  Anthony Kobus & Sons, Boots and Shoes, Fourth and Spruce Streets, Established 1858

On the other side “Pub by Philadelphia Postal Card Co., in Germany.”  It was never mailed, so was perhaps hand-delivered when the Whites visited with the Belz family of Camden.

I was curious about Anthony Kobus & Sons and did a little digging.  The Shoe Retailer and Boots and Shoes Weekly (Vol. 55, No. 6, Boston, Wednesday, August 23, 1905) highlights all the news that’s fit to print in exciting shoe and boot doings.  In the Camden, N.J. section Kobus lands the lead story.

Anthony Kobus & Sons An Enterprising Firm of Shoe Retailers – Their Magnificent Store

Anthony Kobus & Sons, dealers in boots, shoes and rubbers, 409-11 Spruce Street, Camden, N.J., gave to each of their customers a beautiful fan during the recent hot spell.  The fans were decorated on one side with roses and heads of beautiful women lithographed in colors.  This firm have a magnificent big store, light and roomy, with separate departments for the sale of men’s and women’s shoes.  The show windows are paved with tiling, and the shoes are displayed on stands of natural wood bases.  Some have metal uprights and beveled glass tops.  The women’s and children’s window has a decorated steel ceiling and the styles are shown on pyramid stands with circular glass shelves, growing smaller toward the top.  Many electric light bulbs add brilliancy at night.

Here is what the Camden address looks like today.

409-11 Spruce Street Camden NJ

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