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Happy Valentine’s Day!

February 14, 2014

Valentine cupid 1908Hearts?  Flowers?

Which valentine to share?

I decided on hearts AND flowers.

First, I selected one of the earliest in my grandfather’s collection.  These two cherubs apparently want you to know that time is of the essence in letting your valentine know how you feel!  “Valentine Greeting”

Shamrocks float through the air to bring you luck and forget-me-nots surround the clockface, where the hands mark the time as twelve. (On the other side, the postmark on the one penny Benjamin Franklin stamp indicates it was mailed at twelve noon on February 13, 1908 from Fairhill Station in Philadelphia.)

The card, printed in Germany, was addressed to Master Paul White, Tylersport Post Office, Pa. and sent by “Wm. Mergner”

I also couldn’t resist sharing this rose and horseshoe postcard.  The graphic quality appealed to me, and was  such a contrast to the busy floral sweetness of the Valentine Greetings cupid card.

Anthony Kobus & Sons Camden NJ 1908The text says;

Business Improvement Asso’n Carnival of Camden, 1908

Compliments of  Anthony Kobus & Sons, Boots and Shoes, Fourth and Spruce Streets, Established 1858

On the other side “Pub by Philadelphia Postal Card Co., in Germany.”  It was never mailed, so was perhaps hand-delivered when the Whites visited with the Belz family of Camden.

I was curious about Anthony Kobus & Sons and did a little digging.  The Shoe Retailer and Boots and Shoes Weekly (Vol. 55, No. 6, Boston, Wednesday, August 23, 1905) highlights all the news that’s fit to print in exciting shoe and boot doings.  In the Camden, N.J. section Kobus lands the lead story.

Anthony Kobus & Sons An Enterprising Firm of Shoe Retailers – Their Magnificent Store

Anthony Kobus & Sons, dealers in boots, shoes and rubbers, 409-11 Spruce Street, Camden, N.J., gave to each of their customers a beautiful fan during the recent hot spell.  The fans were decorated on one side with roses and heads of beautiful women lithographed in colors.  This firm have a magnificent big store, light and roomy, with separate departments for the sale of men’s and women’s shoes.  The show windows are paved with tiling, and the shoes are displayed on stands of natural wood bases.  Some have metal uprights and beveled glass tops.  The women’s and children’s window has a decorated steel ceiling and the styles are shown on pyramid stands with circular glass shelves, growing smaller toward the top.  Many electric light bulbs add brilliancy at night.

Here is what the Camden address looks like today.

409-11 Spruce Street Camden NJ

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One Comment leave one →
  1. February 15, 2014 12:38 pm

    My father worked at Camden shipyard before he was married. His aunt Mary Parker Follett visited him while he was working there. She was a lady of some renown. Look her up. He was from Quincy, MA and I’ve finally figured out his direct descent from the Adams Presidents. It goes through Ruth Alden Bass, though whom I joined the Mayflower Society.
    Marilyn

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